Education, Research, Patient Care qd

2017 Curt Stern Award: The Complexity of Simple Genetics

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Good Mutants by Nico Katsanis

Good Mutants? Dr. Katsanis (CHDM Director) draws a line and explains the future of genetics, diseases, and the evolution of humanity. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Xv9b5fWHbg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Xv9b5fWHbg

Temperature-activated ion channels in neural crest cells confer maternal fever–associated birth defects

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CHDM - Bridging genetics, genomics, cell biology and clinical investigation

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Welcome to the Center for Human Disease Modeling

As the Director, I invite you to use this web-site as a starting point for accessing information, tools and a wide range of information on our interdisciplinary projects.  Our Center offers a unique, project-based atmosphere that is highly collaborative in a shared-resource setting.  We call it a gathering place where investigators from diverse scientific and medical disciplines can meet and collaborate to challenge and perpetuate each other’s science.

Our faculty and staff are accomplished, highly motivated, and creative scientists with interests in (but not limited to) understanding the architecture of human genetic disease; investigating the mechanisms underlying disease processes and pathomechanism and the identification of novel therapeutic paradigms for inherited disorders in a state-of-the art facility. 

Should you have any questions about our Center or our research, please feel free to directly contact me at nicholas.katsanis@duke.edu.

Nico Katsanis
Director, Center for Human Disease Modeling
Professor of Cell Biology
Brumley Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics
Duke University

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Latest News & Events

October 01, 2018

CHDM Director, Dr. Nicholas Katsanis, will speak at the KOMP/IMPC annual meeting in Bethesda, MD on October 2, 2018. The one day meeting will focus on collaborations with various human disease gene discovery programs. KOMP is a trans-NIH initiative to generate, together with the other members of...

Research Highlights

June 06, 2015
Mutations in DDX3X Are a Common Cause of Unexplained Intellectual Disability with Gender-Specific Effects on Wnt Signaling.

Authors

November 13, 2011
MYH9 and APOL1 are both associated with sickle cell disease nephropathy.

Authors: Ashley-Koch AE, Okocha EC, Garrett ME, Soldano K, De Castro LM, Jonassaint JC, Orringer EP, Eckman JR, Telen MJ.